Supporting children born prematurely

Children born prematurely are at risk of a variety of neurological impairments which can mean they are more likely to need special educational support when they reach school age (Wolke, D. http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/sensitive_parenting_can).  Evidence shows that sensitive parenting can emeliorate these risks. At the Champion Centre in New Zealand children born prematurely attend integrated relationship-based early intervention services with their families where the parent-child relationship is promoted throughout therapy sessions. When I visited the Centre last year, the concepts of relational pedagogy and professional love were observable in therapy sessions:

EI Model

Following on from my Travelling Fellowship funded by WCMT http://www.wcmt.org.uk/users/carolynblackburn2015 Dr. Susan Foster-Cohen from the Champion Centre in NZ http://www.championcentre.org.nz/ will be visiting Birmingham City University to deliver an International Guest Lecture in June, 2016.  Her talk is entitled:

Bio-psycho-social consequences of premature birth: family and professional partnerships in early intervention

The short, medium and long-term impacts of premature birth on the infant, the mother, the family and their educational and social communities are the active subjects of research in a number of academic fields. Such research is revealing trends and likelihoods of developmental, educational, mental health and social consequences of prematurity that can, and must, be addressed in early intervention. Particularly difficult, however, is predicting which children will have which, or any, lasting consequences of their prematurity. This presents a challenge for health, education and social welfare practitioners to translate the research evidence into the best support for each child, the families that raise them, and the teachers that educate them. This talk will review the bio-psycho-social consequences of premature birth and then describe the multi-disciplinary support provided to children born prematurely, their families and their teachers at The Champion Centre in Christchurch, New Zealand. It will focus on the challenges encountered in assessment, monitoring, and intervention; and the importance of developing families as ‘advocates for life’ for their children.

Dr. Susan Foster-Cohen is the Director of the Champion Centre and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Canterbury. She is engaged in active research into the outcomes of parent-partnership interventions at the Centre. She has also been a member of a research team at the University of Canterbury exploring the long-term outcomes of prematurity, with a particular focus on communication and language development. She has held academic positions in universities in the UK, USA, France and New Zealand and has published widely on language development in both pure and applied journals and books.

Places can be booked here https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/bio-psycho-social-consequences-of-premature-birth